Rome, Constantinople and Newly-Converted Europe : Archaeological and Historical Evidence (Roma, İstanbul ve Yeni Dönüştürülmüş Avrupa: Arkeolojik ve Tarihi Kanıtlar)

Bursiyerlerin Yayınları

Rome, Constantinople and Newly-Converted Europe : Archaeological and Historical Evidence (Roma, İstanbul ve Yeni Dönüştürülmüş Avrupa: Arkeolojik ve Tarihi Kanıtlar)

  • Yayınevi: Geisteswissenschaftliches Zentrum Geschichte und Kultur Ostmitteleuropas
  • Derleyen(ler): Maciej Salamon, Marcin Woloszyn, Alexander Musin, Perica Spehar

This publication in two volumes represents the material output from the study by historians, archaeologists, historians of art, and culture anthropologists of the impact of the heritage of Rome and Constantinople on the processes of formation of the Christian medieval civilisation in Central, Eastern, Northern and South-Eastern Europe.
The authors focused in their analyses mainly on phenomena observed in the region of Europe which during Late Antiquity was not a part of the Roman Empire, in other words, had no continuity with Antiquity. The medieval change in this part of the continent may not be described as direct transformation of the Roman heritage. It was not as significant here as in other regions, since next to Rome an appreciable role was played by influence from Constantinople, and the local substrate was stronger than in the west of Europe. However, in the long run, as a result of synthesis of Romanitas, Christianitas and Barbaritas, also this newly converted zone became a part of medieval Europe accepting the heritage of Antiquity i.e. that of Rome and Constantinople in another way.
The book places strong emphasis on the question of the significance of the Byzantine civilisation on the formation of the newly converted Europe, exploring a field of study previously much less addressed by research than Latin Christianisation of the continent. This publication assists the reader in making a relatively easy comparison of archaeological evidence on Christianisation to be had from the Byzantine territory with evidence recovered from the periphery of the Byzantine civilisation, and from the part of Europe which received Christianity from Rome.
While most papers focus on phenomena taking place between AD 700 and 1200 the chronological range of the publication is the period from Late Antiquity/Early Byzantine Period until the Early Modern Era.
Volume I includes contributions from historians, art historians and archaeologists, who examined different aspects of the transformation of the newly converted Europe, and some contributions from archaeologists who propose to trace the process of Christianisation in the evidence on changing burial customs. Volume II contains contributions devoted to the subject of relics, reliquaries and private devotional objects.

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