ANAMED Talks – Center and Periphery, Mobility, and Climate Change in the Forgotten Bronze Age Kingdom of Mukish (Hatay, Turkey)



Date:   30 September 2021
Time:  18:30 (Turkey Local Time, GMT +3)
2021-2022 academic year will start with a talk titled “Center and Periphery, Mobility, and Climate Change in the Forgotten Bronze Age Kingdom of Mukish (Hatay, Turkey)”. The speakers Murat Akar, Tara Ingman and Ulaş Avşar will offer a synopsis of the ongoing research in the Amuq Valley of Hatay from a regional and multi-layered perspective emerging through several intertwined projects. Entangled climate-induced human-landscape interactions, economically-oriented center and periphery dynamics and long/short-term mobility patterns in the forgotten kingdom of Mukish will be explored from the standpoint of the research excavations conducted at the capital city of Alalakh (Tell Atchana) and her hinterland. Addressing controversial issues in Bronze Age politics, migrations and climate change, this event will also stress the high value of multi-spectrum data collection and implementation in archaeological research.

Moderated by Rana Özbal, this online talk will be held in English.

Please register this online event in advance from here. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

If you have missed the talk, you can access it via ANAMED’s Youtube channel.

 

Murat Akar got his BA from the Archaeology and History of Art Department of Bilkent University, his MSc degree in Settlement Archaeology at Middle East Technical University and his PhD degree in Near Eastern Archaeology from the University of Florence in Italy. Being a former research fellow at ANAMED and the Archaeology and History of Art Department of Koç University, he has been teaching at Hatay Mustafa Kemal University, Department of Archaeology since 2016. He is the director of the Amuq Valley Regional Survey Project and the excavations at Tell Atchana, Alalakh. He is also a senior member of the rescue excavations at Toprakhisar Höyük run by the Hatay Archaeological Museum.

His research areas include architecture, memory, and landscape studies, particularly for 2nd millennium BC Anatolia, the Near East, and the Levant. His current research addresses center and periphery dynamics and the role of climate in the longue durée for understanding the continuously shifting population dynamics and cross-cultural encounters in Eastern Mediterranean contexts as part of the TÜBİTAK 1001 project “Geological and Archaeological Traces of Climatic Changes in the Amuq Valley of Hatay during the Holocene”.

Tara Ingman received her BA in Anthropology and Philosophy from New York University and her MA and PhD from the Archaeology and History of Art Department of Koç University. She is currently a post-doctoral fellow at Koç University Research Center for Anatolian Civilizations (ANAMED). She is the Assistant Director of Publications of Tell Atchana, Alalakh Excavations and also the senior field supervisor in charge of Area 1 operations, including both MBA and LBA exposures at the site. Her research focuses on the scientific and anthropological study of burial practices at Tell Atchana and how the intersections between various types of bioarchaeological studies, such as isotopic and ancient DNA analyses, and choices made during burial of the dead can shed light on issues of both individual and group identity and mobility.

Ulaş Avsar got his BSc and MSc degrees from the Geological Engineering Department of Middle East Technical University (METU) and his PhD degree from Universiteit Gent. His main area of research has been sedimentary records of past climates, earthquakes and tsunamis. During his PhD studies, he revealed the sedimentary traces of past earthquakes in lakes located on the North Anatolian Fault, Turkey. Similarly, during his postdoctoral fellowship at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), he did research on the sedimentary traces of past earthquakes in lakes located on the Húsavík-Flatey Fault, North Iceland. Later on, he was granted a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions Individual Fellowship to investigate the sedimentary records of historical eastern Mediterranean tsunamis in lagoons located along the southern coast of Turkey. He is the director of geoarchaeological research in the Amuq Valley and recently has focused his efforts on geoarchaeological investigations of past climate-human interactions, mainly within the scope of the TÜBITAK 1001 project “Geological and Archaeological Traces of Climatic Changes in the Amuq Valley of Hatay during the Holocene”. Since 2017, he has been teaching at the Geological Engineering Department of METU.

Rana Özbal returned to Turkey in 2006, after receiving her BA and PhD from Bates College and Northwestern University respectively. Following a brief period of instructorship at Boğaziçi University and a postdoctoral fellowship at Istanbul University, Özbal began as a department member at the Archaeology and History of Art Department at Koç University in 2010 where she became a YÖK Doçent in 2014 and a Associate Professor in 2018. Özbal has worked extensively in Hatay on the Chalcolithic of the Amuq Valley through excavations at the fifth and sixth millennium site of Tell Kurdu and through field surveys in the plain in general. She has also spent over a decade researching the seventh millennium of Northwest Anatolia, working in Bursa at Barcın Höyük where she was the project co-director. Özbal’s research focuses on spatial reconstructions of households and communities by trying to understand the use of space through sediment geochemical analyses and micro-archaeological methods. She has also been collaborating with researchers using archaeometric techniques useful when interpreting archaeological sites and ancient communities they housed including lipid residue studies as well as mineralogical, elemental and isotopic analyses. Özbal has received an award for excellence in teaching at Koç University where she continues to teach both undergraduate and graduate courses for students in her department and beyond.