Alba Mazza

2018 - 2019 FELLOWS

Alba Mazza

  • University: The University of Sydney
  • Research Topic: The Maritime Coastal Landscape of Aiolian Cyme in Turkey and Selinus in Sicily. Two Sister Port Cities?
  • E-mail: AMAZZA18@KU.EDU.TR

Alba Mazza is a maritime archaeologists, and holds a PhD in Archaeology from the University of Sydney (2017). Her research focuses on the relationship between people and the coastal environment. She is especially interested in understanding how people faced the challenges of living on the shore (such as floods, tsunamis, earthquakes and erosion), and become resilient. Given such an approach, her analysis of the coastal landscape of Mediterranean settlements spans from the Bronze Age to the Late Antiquity, and includes port infrastructures as well as landing spots on the beach. Her project at KUDAR-ANAMED "The maritime coastal landscape of Aiolian Cyme in Turkey and Selinus in Sicily. Two sister port cities?" is a natural outgrowth from her PhD thesis, which dealt with the maritime coastal landscape of Selinus. In that initial study, it was possible to understand that Selinus shares several aspects of the maritime culture and the coastal environment with Aiolian Cyme in Turkey. Hence, during her fellowship Dr. Mazza will investigate port facilities, with a focus on Cyme’s topography, and material evidence from past underwater investigations. The study of those common maritime archaeological features can reveal us a great degree of archaeological and environmental information, and eventually inform us on respectively missing aspects of the maritime landscape of the two ancient cities. On a site-scale, this study will improve our knowledge Cyme, one of the most important coastal settlement of ancient Anatolia in the Greek, Roman and Late Roman period. More broadly this study, by comparing for the first time Cyme in Turkey and Selinus in Sicily, offers new keys for understating important topics in today’s maritime archaeology, such as coastal landscape changes, topographical identity of places, connectivity by sea, and cultural interactions.

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